Sunday, April 10, 2011

You Grow Girl (Gardening book!)



At first I thought "You Grow Girl" was going to be a disappointment. The introduction seemed to be very specific towards urban gardening. I'd read the summary and the reviews online and while it talked a lot about "small space" gardening it never suggested the book was solely for the urbanites. There's even one point during the introduction that suburbanites seem to be all wealthy white women with too much time and money.


That's not me. I live in my parents garage because I can't afford a place where both me and my dog can live (and living without my dog is not an option. When you make a commitment to an animal its for life. End of story).


But the problem with the book seems to lie solely in the introduction (which FYI editors & writers you don't want to exclude a whole population with your introduction if your book isn't quite so slanted).


I've been wanting to review the book for a few months. The problem is everybody wanted to borrow it. Everyone who has looked at the book likes different things about it. Different projects have jumped out at them. The easy projects are one of the best parts about this book. They're practical, inexpensive and well explained.


Another thing I like about this book is that organic is not a huge scary word. I don't feel like I have to make a political commitment or life commitment to "organic." In fact my garden is not going to be 100% organic BUT I feel like I can go mostly organic and that's A-okay. I'm trying to cut out the miracle grow (manure here I come!) and I'm going to try some non-chemical pesticide options. But the soil I buy is not Certified Organic (it's Hyponex Topsoil which I've used for years and trust) and I just buy whatever seeds/plants suit my fancy. The book did not evangelize organic--at least not in an off-putting way--it just gave me my options.


Probably the best thing about this book is that it's made me willing to try new things. I've

started seeds indoor this year (we'll see how that goes). I bought *gasp* organic seed starter rather than miracle grow. I used manure in my garden for the first time. My tomato plants are going to be heirloom because now I know what heirloom is. Overall t

he book has just broadened my gardening horizons without being fussy or pretentious.


It's got nice crafty projects without becoming a craft book. The pictures and illustrations are superb. It's a good gardening book for the beginner or dabbler.


Some of my adventures in gardening this year!


My little herb garden

The garden I've terraced into a clay hillside (with makeshift gate)


My indoor seedling babies



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